General Otolaryngology (ENT), Ear Nose & Throat Surgery

Septoplasty

Introduction to Septoplasty

Septoplasty, sometimes referred to as septal reconstruction, is a procedure that straightens a deviated septum inside your nose.

Written by Doctify Team 27/04/2020

What is a Septoplasty?

Septoplasty, sometimes referred to as septal reconstruction, is a procedure that straightens a deviated septum inside your nose. The septum is the wall made out of bone and cartilage that separates your nostrils. Whilst many people live with a slightly bent septum without ever noticing, in some cases it can be deviated to such an extent that it causes a blockage. This can lead to a number of issues, but primarily it can result in breathing problems. This procedure should not affect the way your nose looks, but nose reshaping can be completed at the same time if you would also like to change its external appearance.

What happens after the Septoplasty procedure?

This is typically performed as an outpatient procedure, which means that you will usually be able to go home the same day. Your nose will be painful and swollen, and it’s likely that you will have to breathe through your mouth for a couple of days because your nose will be packed with dressings to control any bleeding that might occur. Do not blow your nose for at least two weeks after the procedure, and try to sneeze through your mouth if possible. In addition to these precautions, elevating of propping up your head at night can help speed up the recovery process. You should be able to return to work within one or two weeks, but you should refrain from any strenuous activity or contact sports for at least a month. A full recovery can take up to three months, but your surgeon will check on your progress in a follow up consultation.
Some common side effects of this procedure include pain, discomfort, the sensation of having a blocked nose, and a watery red fluid that comes from your nose. Whilst these are temporary, some complications are more permanent. For example, you may get a hole in your septum, and despite this not being a serious problem it can cause a whistling sound when you breathe. Although rare, you may also have an unwanted change in the shape of your nose. Both of these issues will require a second procedure to correct.

Find out more about other relative procedures:

Loading profiles near to your current location…